Analysis of Civilization and Formation of "Order" in the Islamic World

Document Type : Original Article

Author

Assistant Professor in Research Center of Islamic Sciences and Culture, Qom, Iran

10.22081/jips.2021.71485

Abstract

In the science of international politics, subjects such as "the nature of international system", "anarchy", "order" and "change" are considered as the content concepts. Each of the theories of international relations explains the concepts and, accordingly, presents its formation of the milieu of international system and its subdivisions. The present study is placed under the great question of what explanation the level of civilizational analysis in international politics presents for "order" in international system. It specifically deals with the following question: "If we evaluate the 'order' in the realm of a region – such as west Asia or a wider area such as the Islamic world – using the level of civilizational analysis, what formation of 'order' will it offer?" It seems that the hypothesis of 'level of civilizational analysis' in the international politics in dividing the regions of the world presents a new plan and transmits it beyond the dualism of global analysis/ regional analysis. Thus, it explains the campaigns inside the international system on the basis of presenting a new formation of 'order', the rules for its formation and the sources effective in its formation. The level of civilizational analysis analyzes the order in the Islamic world by considering different forms of Islamic civilizations (or civilization trends) inside the Islamic world, and explains the behavioral campaigns (convergent/ divergent) on the basis of hierarchal division of civilization inside the Islamic world.

Keywords


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